A primer on Google analytics


Share this :   | | | |
A primer on Google analytics

Understanding how to use Google Analytics is one of the main skills you need to become an ace digital marketer. It’s a powerful tool that can provide comprehensive data about your website’s performance, but it can be confusing and daunting to a newcomer who isn’t familiar with the tech lingo.

In my daily work, I monitor analytics across all of USGBC’s digital properties to understand what’s working on a webpage and what isn’t; for inspiration on article topics (for instance, if there has been a spike in searches related to energy efficiency, perhaps it’s time to write an article about that); and to help other departments understand what content our audience finds most useful. The information Google Analytics provides a true north, if you will, in what I need to spend my energy and time on as a digital marketer.

If you’re just beginning to dip your toes into the digital marketing field or need a Google Analytics refresher, here’s what you need to know to get started in collecting data reports.

Navigating Google Analytics

Let’s say you already have Google Analytics installed on your website (if not, check out Moz’s guide on how to set up the tool). Once logged in, you’ll see an overview of your website’s performance regarding number of users, sessions and bounce rate—we’ll discuss these terms later on—and on the left-hand navigation bar, you’ll see several tabs, including “Real-time,” “Audience,” “Acquisition” and “Behavior.”

Real-time
This section will show you real-time data, including how many active visitors are currently on your website, how many pages they’re viewing, the most active pages and where your users live.

Audience
This is my favorite section of Google Analytics, because it shares useful information about your online audience on a macro basis. The Audience report will give you a ton of demographic data about your users, including their ages and interests, but it also will show you how many pages a typical web user visits after coming to your website, the average amount of time they spend, what devices they’re using and if they’ve been on your website before.

Acquisition
This section will show you where your web traffic is coming from, such as organic searches (if a user types “flowers” into Google and then arrives at a flower shop’s website, that’s an organic search), emails, social media or paid searches. If you’re analyzing whether your marketing campaign is effective at driving traffic to your website, this is the tab you’ll use most often.

Behavior
Curious how much traffic a web page is getting? Look no further than the Behavior tab. This is where you’ll find information about pageviews, unique pageviews and bounce rates.

Terms to know

As you work your way through Google Analytics, here are the common terms you’ll run across.

Pageviews:When a page is loaded in a web browser. If a user views a page multiple times, it’s counted in this metric. (If you’re looking for information about how many times a PDF document has been downloaded, those are designated as “events” and not pageviews, since they’re not HTML files.)

Unique pageviews: Unique pageviews essentially show how many times your page has been visited at least once in a given session. When a user views a page multiple times, each visit is counted as a pageview. With unique pageviews, if a user visits a page more than once during a session, this will only count as a single unique pageview.

Bounce rate: The percentage of users who visit only one page of your website. Learn more about lowering your bounce rate.

Session: A group of actions—such as a transaction, pageview or PDF download—that a user makes on your website within a given time frame.

Conversion: When a user makes a purchase on your website during a session.

Medium: Where your web traffic is coming from, such as Google or an email.

Resources

Learn more about web best practices

4 tips on structuring an article for content marketing


Share this :   | | | |
4 tips on structuring an article for content marketing

Content marketing encompasses a range of formats: articles, blogs, infographics, videos and social media posts. What they all share is a goal to increase engagement or drive sales of a particular service, product or publication through providing information or storytelling that is compelling for the reader.

At USGBC, I work on the article component, creating and editing website content that shares information about our products, such as LEED. In 2016, we published over a thousand articles. We have a lot of brands and stakeholders, so we have a lot of content—and it needs to be prepared quickly. Here are the main four things I do to shape an article:

1) Highlight the goal.

When writing an article, make your headline and your call to action obvious. For example, our LEED Link series promotes products that our website users are already searching for and reading about. In bite-sized amounts, the articles share some of the details users need and ends with a button that leads them to further resources or products.

Even when an article highlights an individual or event, not a product, tie it back implicitly to why the reader should care. A simple example: “LEED credential holders make an impact as Pros, Fellows and Faculty” could have been titled “Meet our top LEED Pros, Fellows and Faculty,” emphasizing the personal. But readers may not know these influencers. What they are interested in is how they themselves can make a difference through attaining LEED credentials. Through that framing, they are more likely to click on the examples of the people who have attained this goal, as well as the ultimate call to action.

2) Keep it short, and break up the text.

Your customers are busy people, and they appreciate articles that get to the point. At USGBC, we recommend 300–500 words for most pieces. Writing for the web is not the same as writing for print, and the skills we learned in school about long-form writing need to be adapted to the digital world.

Add subheads and bulleted lists as ways to break up your text and allow customers to scan for the information they need.

3) Use images, graphics and interactive content.

Use a feature image or header that expresses your article goal simply and appealingly. Embed photos, quizzes, maps or infographics, as in our article on LEED-certified hospitality destinations, to further draw the reader in and make your topic more concrete and resonant.

One of our most successful posts each year is the Top 10 States for LEED, which includes an infographic breaking down the hard numbers and highlighting each state’s achievements.

4) Show how the customer belongs.

Whatever kind of business you have, your customers are part of a community that shares a common goal. At USGBC, the common goal is global sustainability and health through high-performing green buildings. Most of our articles recognize that sense of being part of something larger than ourselves and encouraging greater involvement.

This can be done in a playful way, as with our test-your-expertise quiz on green building, or a more serious way, as in our article on how building to LEED standards combats climate change. As you create your content, think about ways you can add a sense of community to your marketing in an organic way.

See our tips on writing for better SEO