How to craft article titles for the digital age


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How to craft article titles for the digital age

In a time when a lot of content marketing is done on the internet, writers and editors must consider the specific needs of the reader who is accessing their articles online. Here are my top three tips for how to reach them with clear headlines:

1. Keep them as short as you can.

Writing for a print layout gives you the luxury of being creative and clever with your titles, such as by using metaphors, imagery and colloquial turns of phrase. This often manifests as what I call “university press style”—a general phrase followed by further context.

Example: “Playing with fire: Global climate change and the catastrophic rise in forest fires in the American west”

However, writing articles for the web means your title needs to be concise. It will be squeezed into preview boxes in social media and into modules on webpages. If the title is too long, the whole line won’t appear. This limitation can be good, though—it forces you to focus on the main point of your article.

Edited version: “Study shows climate change worsens forest fires”

Titles must often fit within modules on a website layout

Titles must often fit within modules on a website layout.

2. Make them describe what the article is actually about.

Making your title clearly reflect the subject of the article works on two levels. One, readers who are scrolling through content on their mobile devices or scanning a list of recent articles in an email digest are able to quickly see what content is available and to click on what’s relevant to them. Two, it’s good for SEO. Organic search terms will be reflective of readers’ keywords or questions, which tend to be very straightforward.

Be specific, and be factual, to reflect the news content or product you are writing about.

Example: “Leading with a sustainability mindset brings it all together”

Edited version: “Mayor of Anytown adds LEED certification to 2018 building code”

3. Listicles really do work.

The stats don’t lie. Our analytics have shown that readers love to click on pieces that break down a topic with a number, through titles similar to these: “Top 10 States for LEED,” “Top 4 benefits of installing solar panels,” “3 reasons to earn your LEED Green Associate credential.”

You don’t want to do this for every article, of course, and you must deliver on your title’s promise, not make it mere clickbait. But it’s a good idea to use numbers where appropriate in your content marketing, along with other terms that trigger the same sense of “this sounds easy!” For example, “Top 4 benefits of installing solar panels” could also be “How to install solar panels on your home” or “Simple steps to solar panel installation.” People google “how…” more than just about any other term. It’s all about making your content relevant to the reader.

Learn more about structuring articles for content marketing

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