Links we love: What the marketing team uses


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Links we love: What the marketing team uses

The USGBC marketing and communications team works daily on emails, articles, graphic design and social media. As we seek to stay current with trends and best practices, we find inspiration and education from a lot of other professional sources.

Here’s a quick roundup of some of the resources we recommend:

Nora Knox, Digital Marketing Director

  • CMO.com is a great source of marketing insights, expertise and inspiration aimed at helping deliver standout experiences in a digital world.
  • I like to visit the Moz blog for advice, research, how-tos and insights about SEO and online marketing skills.
  • Digiday offers a global view of the media and marketing industries, as well as the role of technology in these industries.

Annie Patton, Director, Creative Services

  • Canva’s blog has some great roundups and resources on different topics related to marketing. It provides a lot of inspiration and ideas to help get the creativity flowing.

  • I like to flip through Communication Arts, both the website and the magazine. It’s a good resource on topics related to various aspects of visual marketing. Their frequent competitions also provide insight on what’s new in different categories throughout the industry.

Amy Civetti, Art Director

  • I like A Creative DC—both on Instagram (hashtag #acreativedc) and its website. The feed is a nice way to discover Washington, D.C., through the perspective of its creative community. It features all sorts of local creatives and makers, and shows the city through alleyways, murals, retailers, movements, behind-the-scenes content and workspaces. It’s a really refreshing way for me to see what local creatives are doing.

  • For design-specific inspiration, I have been following some letterpress designers and shops—especially Ryan Tempro, based in St. Augustine, Florida. I think in digital design, we sometimes forget to focus on the experience the end customer actually has with our design—a really important component. Letterpress work slows down design, focuses on the fundamentals and forces us to consider some other senses beyond just “does this look good?”.

Heather Benjamin, Content Marketing Manager

  • For exploration of tricky grammar and usage questions, I turn to Mignon Fogarty’s “Grammar Girl” blog. Fogarty, a journalism professor, started Grammar Girl as a podcast, and now also publishes articles and social media posts that explain the twists and turns of English for content professionals and the general public alike. Her knowledge and approachable style always leave me with a “huh, great to know!” feeling and the ability to write and edit at a deeper level.
  • The website of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, savingplaces.org, always inspires me, because the Trust shares both the human stories and the architectural details of saving historic sites. At USGBC, we don’t just work with green buildings, but also with people and communities. I find great examples on this site of how social justice and cultural heritage intersect with the built environment.

Ursula Fox-Koor, Email Marketing Manager

  • Whenever I need some “emailspiration,” I turn to Really Good Emails. It’s the Pinterest of email design, and you can view emails by industry or campaign type. My favorite part is that each email has a link to the code via CodePen, so you can play around with the HTML and get a behind-the-scenes look at the content.

Jake Rose, Email Marketing Specialist

  • I am a big fan of the Hubspot Marketing blog. Marketing means different things to different people, and everyone does it a little differently. Hubspot sort of sets the standard for a marketing practices. It brings everyone onto the same level.

  • I really love the Google Trends tool, a public-facing Google search data display. It’s interesting to compare two search terms to see what people are interested in. For example, there are close to twice as many searches for “LEED” as for “green building.” That’s not something I would have expected, but it is reflective of consumer behavior in a way that otherwise would have been very expensive to research.

See links recommended by our social media team

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